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Archive for the ‘Food Storage’ Category

“Sell By” Dates and Other Misleading Labels

Posted by Elise on December 30, 2013

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Shelf Life of Condiments

Posted by Elise on May 27, 2011

Pawel Kryj, pawel_231 (sxc.hu)

You like to keep your peanut butter in the fridge. Your spouse says it’s fine on the shelf. Who’s right? Actually, you both are, as long as you plan to finish the jar within a few months. Put an end to the “Great Condiment Debate” with this handy list of storage and shelf life tips for your favorite dressings and spreads:Ketchup Like many condiments, ketchup can be stored either in the refrigerator or on the shelf even after it’s been opened. If you don’t use it regularly, however, opt for the fridge. Unopened ketchup will last at least a year. Once opened, it should be used within a month if stored in the cabinet or within six months if stored in the refrigerator.

Mayonnaise Unopened mayonnaise stored in the pantry should Read the rest of this entry »

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One Month Basic Food Storage Kit Recipes

Posted by Elise on July 3, 2010

Food Storage Recipes

Using only the ingredients contained in the

One-Month Basic Food Storage Kit

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Home Storage Center, Lindon, Utah November 2005 Read the rest of this entry »

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Freezing Mushrooms

Posted by Elise on June 13, 2010

 Preparation  – Choose mushrooms free from spots and decay. Sort according to size. Wash thoroughly in cold water. Trim off ends of stems. If mushrooms are larger than 1 inch across, slice them or cut them into quarters.

lizerixt (sxc.hu)

Mushrooms can be steamed or heated in fat in a fry pan. Steamed mushrooms will keep longer than those heated in fat. Read the rest of this entry »

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Home food storage lasts 30 years or more

Posted by Elise on March 19, 2010

Sarah Jane Weaver

LDS Church News

January 19, 2008

Research by BYU professors sheds new light on the shelf life of food storage.

Professors in the Department of Nutrition, Dietetics and Food Science at BYU found that when canned and stored properly, food such as wheat and rice can last more than 30 years. Read the rest of this entry »

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Canning Chocolate Sauces Unsafe

Posted by Elise on March 19, 2010

 

De Lima (sxc.hu)

Brian A. Nummer, Ph.D.
National Center for Home Food Preservation
July 2003

 

Numerous recipes for chocolate sauces circulate on the internet and in newsgroups. Chocolate sauces are low acid recipes and are a risk for botulism food poisoning. Therefore any Read the rest of this entry »

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Selecting, Preparing and Canning Chicken or Rabbit

Posted by Elise on March 19, 2010

ughlau (sxc.hu)

Chicken or Rabbit

Procedure:  Choose freshly killed and dressed, healthy animals. Large chickens are Read the rest of this entry »

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Canning Pumpkin Butter & Mashed or Pureed Squashes

Posted by Elise on February 22, 2010

landmarkmd (sxc.hu)

Home canning is not recommended for pumpkin butter or any mashed or pureed pumpkin or winter squash. Read the rest of this entry »

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Canning Butter

Posted by Elise on January 25, 2010

chidsey (sxc.hu)

National Center for Home Food Preservation

www.uga.edu

Indeed, there are some directions for ‘canning’ butter in circulation on the Internet. Most of what we have seen are not really canning, as they do not have Boiling Water or Pressure Canning processes applied to the filled jar. Read the rest of this entry »

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Hold that Mold

Posted by Elise on January 25, 2010

stevekrh19 (sxc.hu)

Do you sometimes wonder if you should throw away food that has mold on it? Can you cut off the bad part and eat the rest? It depends on the food.

Molds are like bacteria: some are safe, some harmful. The molds that are essential parts of Read the rest of this entry »

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Family Home Storage – A New Message

Posted by Elise on December 12, 2009

Check the expiration date on

 your ideas about home storage.

You may need to throw some of them out.

As a single mother working for a law firm in Phoenix, Arizona, USA, Evelyn Jeffries struggled to find the time and the space necessary for home storage. Although she attended activities and meetings about food storage and tried to be obedient to prophetic counsel, like many Church members, she found it difficult to imagine what she could ever do with the hundreds of pounds of wheat she was told she needed to have for her and her daughter.

 When a sister in her ward suggested a different approach, Sister Jeffries discovered the key to successful home storage: Read the rest of this entry »

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Canning Dry Beans

Posted by Elise on November 24, 2009

getyel (sxc.hu)

When canning dry beans is it necessary to rehydrate by soaking them before you can them?

Thank you for your question.  We use the USDA Home Canning guides to answer canning questions and the procedure to safely can dry beans at home includes Read the rest of this entry »

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Canning Recipes

Posted by Elise on November 24, 2009

Mild Tomato Salsa Recipe

DontBblu (sxc.hu)

160 Servings Prep: 1-1/2 hours Process: 20 min.

  • 36 medium tomatoes, peeled and quartered
  • 4 medium green peppers, chopped
  • 3 large onions, chopped
  • 2 cans (12 ounces each) tomato paste
  • 1-3/4 cups white vinegar
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 medium sweet red pepper, chopped
  • 1 celery rib, chopped
  • 15 garlic cloves, minced
  • 4 to 5 jalapeno peppers, seeded and chopped
  • 1/4 cup canning salt
  • 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon hot pepper sauce

In a large kettle, cook tomatoes, uncovered, over medium heat for 20 minutes. Drain, reserving 2 cups liquid. Return tomatoes to the kettle.

Stir in the green peppers, onions, tomato paste, vinegar, sugar, red pepper, celery, garlic, jalapenos, canning salt, hot pepper sauce and reserved tomato liquid.

Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, for 1 hour, stirring frequently.

Ladle hot mixture into hot jars, leaving 1/4-in. headspace. Adjust caps. Process for 20 minutes in a boiling-water bath. Yield: 10 pints.

 

Nutrition Facts: 1 serving (2 tablespoons) equals 14 calories, trace fat (trace saturated fat), 0 cholesterol, 182 mg sodium, 3 g carbohydrate, 1 g fiber, trace protein.

Country Woman Christmas Annual 2006, p56

Garden Tomato Relish

160 Servings Prep: 1-1/2 hours + simmering Process: 20 min.

  • 10 pounds tomatoes
  • 3 large sweet onions, finely chopped
  • 2 medium sweet red peppers, finely chopped
  • 2 medium green peppers, finely chopped
  • 2 teaspoons mustard seed
  • 1 teaspoon celery seed
  • 4-1/2 cups white vinegar
  • 2-1/2 cups packed brown sugar
  • 3 tablespoons canning salt
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg

In a large saucepan, bring 8 cups water to a boil. Add tomatoes, a few at a time; boil for 30 seconds. Drain and immediately place tomatoes in ice water. Drain and pat dry; peel and finely chop. Place in a stockpot. Add onions and peppers.

Place mustard and celery seed on a double thickness of cheesecloth; bring up corners of cloth and tie with string to form a bag. Add spice bag and the remaining ingredients to the pot. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 60-70 minutes or until slightly thickened. Discard spice bag.

Carefully ladle relish into hot 1-pint jars, leaving 1/2-in. headspace. Remove air bubbles; wipe rims and adjust lids. Process in boiling-water canner for 20 minutes. Yield: 10 pints.

 

Nutrition Facts: 2 tablespoons equals 20 calories, trace fat (trace saturated fat), 0 cholesterol, 136 mg sodium, 5 g carbohydrate, trace fiber, trace protein.

Taste of Home June/July 2009, p43

Mint Jelly

dubbelkikdesign.nl

88 Servings Prep: 30 min. + processing

  • 4-1/2 cups water
  • 3 cups packed fresh mint, crushed
  • 7 cups sugar
  • 1/4 cup bottled lemon juice
  • 2 to 4 drops green food coloring
  • 2 pouches (3 ounces each) liquid pectin

In a large saucepan, bring water and mint to a boil. Remove from the heat; cover and let stand for 15 minutes. Strain, reserving 3-1/3 cups liquid (discard remaining liquid).

In a Dutch oven, combine the sugar, lemon juice, food coloring and reserved liquid. Bring to a boil; cover and stir for 1 minute. Add pectin; return to a boil. Cook and stir for 1 minute. Remove from the heat; let stand for 5 minutes.

Skim off foam. Pour hot liquid into hot sterilized jars, leaving 1/4-in. headspace. Adjust caps. Process for 10 minutes in a boiling-water bath. Yield: 11 half-pints.

 

 Nutrition Facts: 1 serving (2 tablespoons) equals 62 calories, trace fat (trace saturated fat), 0 cholesterol, 1 mg sodium, 16 g carbohydrate, trace fiber, trace protein.

Taste of Home August/September 2004, p15

Chinese Plum Sauce

mouse (sxc.hu)

  • 8 cups plums, pitted, halved (3 pounds)
  • 1 cup onion, chopped
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon
  • ginger root, minced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup rice vinegar or 1/2 cup cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon cloves

In large heavy saucepan, bring plums, onions, water, ginger and garlic to boil over medium heat; cover, reduce heat to low and simmer, stirring occasionally, until plums and onions are very tender, about 30 minutes.

Press through food mill or sieve and return to clean pan; stir in sugar, vinegar, coriander, salt, cinnamon, pepper and cloves. Bring to boil, stirring; reduce heat to low and simmer until mixture reaches consistency of applesauce, about 45 minutes.

Fill and seal jars; process in boiling water bath for 30 minutes.

Makes about 4 cups

freecanningrecipes.com

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Storing Fruit and Vegetables

Posted by Elise on November 19, 2009

bubbels (sxc.hu)

Have on hand potatoes, onions, garlic, carrots, salad greens, parsley, and a few other fresh herbs like basil and dill. You also may want to stock cucumbers, scallions, assorted citrus, mushrooms, red and green peppers, and celery for slicing and eating raw or for flavoring sauces, soups, salads, and stews. Keep an assortment of fresh fruits – apples, oranges, grapes, bananas, or whatever is in season – for snacking, slicing into cereals, or making quick dessert sauces. Read the rest of this entry »

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Long Term Food Storage

Posted by Elise on November 18, 2009

Long  term storage means a supply of food that will last a long time, and that you can survive on.   Of  course, they must be properly packaged and stored in a cool dry place.  Some recommended containers are #10 cans, foil pouches, or PETE bottles.  Sometimes plastics buckets can be used.

For more information talk to your Relief Society, Self Reliance/Emergency Preparedness Specialist, Cannery Coordinator, visit providentliving.org, or just ask me. Read the rest of this entry »

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To Men of the Priesthood

Posted by Elise on November 16, 2009

President Gordon B. Hinckley, Ensign, November, 2002

Brethren, I wish to urge again the importance of self-reliance on the part of every individual Church member and family.

None of us knows when a catastrophe might strike. Sickness, injury, unemployment may affect any of us.

We have a great welfare program with facilities for such things as grain storage in various areas. It is important that we do this. But the best place to have some food set aside is within our homes, together with a little money in savings. The best welfare program is our own welfare program. Five or six cans of wheat in the home are better than a bushel in the welfare granary. Read the rest of this entry »

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Cooking with Basic Food Storage

Posted by Elise on November 16, 2009

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Tips…………………………………………………………………………………….2

Whole wheat…………………………………………………………………………3

Legumes………………………………………………………………………………7

Rice…………………………………………………………………………………….9

Oats……………………………………………………………………………………10

Powdered milk……………………………………………………………………..12

Soup mix……………………………………………………………………………..15

Pasta…………………………………………………………………………………..16

Dried apples…………………………………………………………………………16

Cornmeal……………………………………………………………………………..18

Flour basics………………………………………………………………………….18

Honey………………………………………………………………………………….19

Sourdough……………………………………………………………………………19

Dry-pack product directions (for selected items) ………………………..21 Read the rest of this entry »

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Date Labeling on Foods

Posted by Elise on November 12, 2009

sundesigns (sxc.hu)

Except for infant formula and some baby foods, product dating is not generally required by the federal government.  Dating of some foods is required in over 20 states but there is no uniform accepted dating system in the U.S.  There are some areas where almost none of the food is dated.

Types of Dates Read the rest of this entry »

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Keeping Food Safe During an Emergency

Posted by Elise on November 12, 2009

readman (sxc.hu)

Did you know that a flood, fire, national disaster, or the loss of power from high winds, snow, or ice could jeopardize the safety of your food? Knowing how to determine if food is safe and how to keep food safe will help minimize the potential loss of food and reduce the risk of food borne illness. This fact sheet will help you make the right decisions for keeping your family safe during an emergency.

ABCD’s of Keeping Food Safe in an Emergency Read the rest of this entry »

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